(877) 949 - 1684
Free Shipping On
Orders Over $100

After you have captured your survey photos you will need to prepare your photos for your ortho-mosaic generation software. The steps below will explain how to add GPS location to JPG images and convert RAW to TIFF images.

The RAW & JPG images were saved in the Photo folder inside the DCIM folder of the SD card. We recommend you move the DCIM folder from the SD card to your computer hard drive to speed up processing times. Create a new folder inside the DCIM folder named something such as "Processed".

Inside the Photo folder move the JPG images to a separate folder from the RAW images. You can click on a JPG and in the View>Details layout click the Type column title to sort the folder by type to make selecting only the JPGs easier.

Extract the drone's flight controller log file:

Convert the log file to either a CSV, GPX or KML.

Download and install Geosetter. Apply the GPS locations from the log file to the JPG images, video guide HERE. Move the JPGs back to the Photo folder so the RAW and JPG images are together in the same order they were taken. Do not delete any photos yet if you plan to clean up the unnecessary photos (ascent, turns, descent).

Download our QGIS software package that corresponds to the OS you're using. Once the MAPIR_Processing folder is downloaded, extracted and located in the proper folder run the QGIS program. If this is your first time running our QGIS plugin and you are using a Windows OS please make sure to run QGIS as administrator.

Once QGIS is loaded, go to Plugins > MAPIR > MAPIR at the top of the window to launch our plugin:

 On the Pre-Process tab select your camera model from the drop down menu. Click the browse buttons and select your input and output file locations. Then click the "Pre-Process Images" button to begin the conversion of the RAW to TIFF images.

The images will be processed as quickly as possible based on the speed of your computer. It may take awhile so please be patient. When the process is complete the log window will let you know it's complete. 

You are now ready to load the images into your ortho-mosaic generation software. If you have captured multi-spectral reflectance data we recommend calibrating your images for the best results.

While the steps outlined in our general work-flow can be followed for the more basic processing software (MAPIR Cloud, Drone Deploy, MapsMadeEasy) there are specific steps that should be followed for advanced stitching using point cloud software such as Pix4D and Agisoft Photoscan:

Step 1: Convert log file to GPX format using Mission Planner

Step 2: Geo-tag your images in Geosetter with the GPX track file

Step 3: Pre-process the images in our MAPIR QGIS plugin. Optional to choose to correct image vignette but not necessary since the point cloud software will typically correct this for you.

Step 4: Stitch images into ortho-mosaics using your point cloud software, making sure to choose the calibrated camera profiles (Pix4D or Photoscan).

Step 5: Calibrate the ortho-mosaics in our MAPIR QGIS plugin using an image of our Calibration Target (recommended)

Step 6: Calculate the index (ie NDVI) image in the rastor calculator of QGIS. Video tutorial here.

Step 7: Apply the color gradient (lut) of your choosing using the previous step software (see video guide).

Agisoft Photoscan does have camera profiles but it seems it's better to simply enter in some basic information and let the software calibrate it itself.

Under Tools > Camera Calibration, enter these values for the Survey2 cameras:

 This guide walks you through the 3DR SOLO hardware and software modifications required to trigger the Survey2 cameras from a PWM signal using the Survey2 HDMI Trigger Cable.

While easily reversible, the software changes to allow PWM triggering will not allow you to control the GoPro in the 3DR SOLO GoPro gimbal. You will still get live video feed, ability to tilt with the controller and powered stabilization but must start/stop the camera manually.

 Disclaimer: Proceed at your own risk, we are not liable for any damage you may cause to your SOLO or camera as a result of these instructions. If you follow everything correctly you will not cause any damage and can easily revert back to the original settings by doing a factory reset.

 

Step 1: Remove SOLO battery, slide off GPS cover, unscrew the 7 screws holding the battery tray.

Step 2: Cut servo plug off of the Survey2 HDMI Trigger Cable. Solder the white cable to PIN19 (PWM7) (orange wire location in below photo) and black cable to GND3 on the SOLO mainboard (brown wire location in below photo):

 BE VERY CAREFUL NOT TO BRIDGE ANY PINS WITH SOLDER!

Step 3: Power on SOLO and remote, connect your computer's wifi to the SOLO wifi (Sololink).

Step 4: Open Mission Planner and connect to SOLO (Auto or UDP 115200)

**DO NOT UPDATE FIRMWARE IF ASKED**

Step 5: Click "Config/Tuning" button at the top of screen. Click "Full Parameter List" on the left. In the search box on the right type "rc7_function". Double click the value box (0) and change to 10. Click "Write Parameter" on the right to save. Click "Flight Data" button at the top, then go back to "Config/Tuning" and "Full Parameter List", searching again for "rc7-function" and make sure the value says 10.

Step 6: At the top click the "Initial Setup" button, click "Optional Hardware" on the left, and then "Camera Gimbal". Change the values for the Shutter section according to the below values and then press ENTER on your keyboard:

RC7

Servo Limits:

Min 1000

Max 1900

Shutter:

Pushed: 2000

Not Pushed: 1000

Duration: 1

 Navigate to "Flight Data" and then back to "Initial Setup" > "Optional Hardware" > "Camera Gimbal" and verify all settings are exactly as the above photo.

Step 7: Turn Survey2 cameras on. Click side button (Settings), click front button and navigate to "Time Lapse" and press top button until it reads OFF. Do this for all cameras you want to trigger via PWM.

Step 8: Plug HDMI trigger cable wired to SOLO into the Survey2 cameras.

Step 9: Back in Mission Planner go to "Flight Data" screen, right click with mouse anywhere on the map, choose "Trigger Camera NOW" test camera trigger. If the camera(s) does not trigger then you will need to factory reset the SOLO and redo the above steps in Mission Planner.

Step 10: Mission complete... safe flying! :)

 This guide walks you through the hardware and software modifications required to trigger the Survey2 cameras from a PWM signal using the Survey2 HDMI Trigger Cable.

 Disclaimer: Proceed at your own risk, we are not liable for any damage you may cause to your UAV or camera as a result of these instructions. If you follow everything correctly you will not cause any damage and can easily revert back to the original settings by doing a factory reset.

 

Step 1: Insert servo plug from HDMI trigger cable into Pixhawk AUX PWM port of your choice (typically the second slot, RC10 port). Make sure the white cable is in the bottom PWM signal row of pins just like the below photo:

Step 3: Connect Pixhawk to your computer using USB cable. Open Mission Planner and click Connect button at top right.

Step 4: Click "Config/Tuning" button at the top of screen. Click "Full Parameter List" on the left. In the search box on the right type "rc7_function". Confirm the value is 0.

Step 5: At the top click the "Initial Setup" button, click "Optional Hardware" on the left, and then "Camera Gimbal". Change the values for the Shutter section according to the below values and then press ENTER on your keyboard:

RC10

Servo Limits:

Min 1000

Max 1900

Shutter:

Pushed: 2000

Not Pushed: 1000

Duration: 1

 Navigate to "Flight Data" and then back to "Initial Setup" > "Optional Hardware" > "Camera Gimbal" and verify all settings are exactly as the above photo.

Step 6: Turn Survey2 cameras on. Click side button (Settings), click front button and navigate to "Time Lapse" and press top button until it reads OFF. Do this for all cameras you want to trigger via PWM.

Step 7: Plug HDMI trigger cable wired to Pixhawk into the Survey2 cameras.

Step 8: Back in Mission Planner go to "Flight Data" screen, right click with mouse anywhere on the map, choose "Trigger Camera NOW" test camera trigger. If the camera(s) does not trigger then you may need to do a factory reset on the Pixhawk and redo the above steps in Mission Planner.

Step 9: Mission complete... safe flying! :)

After you have captured your survey photos you will need to prepare your photos for your ortho-mosaic generation software. The steps below will explain how to do this for each camera:

  • Add GPS location to JPG images

  • Convert RAW to TIFF

  • Correct vignette of RAW and JPG images

RAW+JPG Mode [Recommended]:

The RAW & JPG images were saved in the Photo folder inside the DCIM folder of the SD card. We recommend you move the DCIM folder from the SD card to your computer hard drive to speed up processing times. Create a new folder inside the DCIM folder named something such as "Processed".

Inside the Photo folder move the JPG images to a separate folder from the RAW images. You can click on a JPG and in the View>Details layout click the Type column title to sort the folder by type to make selecting only the JPGs easier.

Extract the drone's flight controller log file:

Convert the log file to either a CSV, GPX or KML.

Download and install Geosetter. Apply the GPS locations from the log file to the JPG images, video guide HERE. Move the JPGs back to the Photo folder so the RAW and JPG images are together in the same order they were taken. Do not delete any photos yet if you plan to clean up the unnecessary photos (ascent, turns, descent).

Download our Fiji software package HERE that corresponds to the Windows OS you're using. Once the Fiji.app folder is downloaded and extracted run the ImageJ exe in the main folder.

Go to Plugins > MAPIR > Pre-Process Images From Directory

 

In the windows that pop up, choose the Photo folder as the input and the Processed folder as the output. The images will be processed as quickly as possible based on the speed of your computer. It may take awhile so please be patient. When the process is complete the log window will let you know it's complete. 

You are now ready to load the images into your ortho-mosaic generation software.

JPG Mode:

The JPG images were saved in the Photo folder inside the DCIM folder of the SD card. We recommend you move the DCIM folder from the SD card to your computer hard drive to speed up processing times. Create a new folder inside the DCIM folder named something such as "Processed".

Extract the drone's flight controller log file:

Convert the log file to either a CSV, GPX or KML.

Download and install Geosetter. Apply the GPS locations from the log file to the JPG images, video guide HERE. Do not delete any photos yet if you plan to clean up the unnecessary photos (ascent, turns, descent).

Download our Fiji software package HERE that corresponds to the Windows OS you're using. Once the Fiji.app folder is downloaded and extracted run the ImageJ exe in the main folder.

Go to Plugins > MAPIR > Post Process Images From Directory

In the windows that pop up, choose the Photo folder as the input and the Processed folder as the output. The images will be processed as quickly as possible based on the speed of your computer. It may take awhile so please be patient. When the process is complete the log window will let you know it's complete. 

You are now ready to load the images into your ortho-mosaic generation software.

Here are the steps to extract the DJI flight log file and convert it to a .GPX for GeoSetter.

 Step 1: 

 Step 2:

Step 3: On gpsvisualizer.com change output format to GPX. Click the "Choose File" button to load your csv. Click "Convert" button. On page that opens, right click on the "following link" text and choose "Save link as..." to save the converted GPX.

Step 4: Follow the below video tutorial (starting at minute 4:06) about geo-tagging in GeoSetter using the GPX file.

Pix4D has built in support for our MAPIR cameras, but sometimes you may need to improve the results slightly. You can follow the below steps to add your own camera profile to the camera database:

Camera Profiles:

Survey2 - Visible Light (RGB)

Survey2 - NDVI (Red+NIR)

Survey2 - Infrared Light

Survey2 - Red Light

Survey2 - Green Light

Survey2 - Blue Light

Survey1 - Visible Light (RGB)

Survey1 - NDVI (Blue+NIR)

Steps to Add Custom Camera Profiles:

  1. Close Pix4D if it is open
  2. Locate the user database file on your computer at: C:\Users\[USERNAME]\AppData\Local\pix4d\common\16\ucmdb.xml    where [USERNAME] is your Windows computer login name. The AppData folder is hidden so you will need to enable hidden files and folders in your file browser in order to see it.
  3. Open the xml file in a text editor like Notepad (should be able to just double-click to open, otherwise open your text editor and drag the file into the open editor window)
  4. Download the camera profile above that corresponds to your modified camera.
  5. Open the xml camera profile in your text editor
  6. Copy the text from the <camera> to the </camera>
  7. On the ucmdb.xml file that is open in your editor, paste the copied text after one of the other </camera> lines. If no </camera> lines exist, copy it after the <vendorId value="pix4d"/> line and before the </cameraModelDB> line. Example xml download HERE.
  8. Save the ucmdb.xml file
  9. Relaunch Pix4D and either start a new project or open an existing one.
  10. Click the Camera icon (Image Properties Editor) at the top left of the main window. If this is a new project, go to the next step.
  11. Click the "View..." button under the "Selected Camera Model" section.
  12. Click the drop-down from the "Camera Model Name" and select the profile you have added, which should have a "user" icon (upper half of a person profile).
  13. Select the "OK" button at the bottom and run your project.

Any questions please let us know.

Click the below links to learn how to geo-reference your images:

Also, we have a more thorough video that shows you how to do it here:

Video guide to pull the 3DR SOLO logs for use in geo-referencing your captured images:

We recommend using the dataflash .bin log files